Walcot and Co

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  • Lady's hooded Orkney chair

Lady's hooded Orkney chair

1,200.00
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Lady's hooded Orkney chair

1,200.00

A classic oak hooded straw back Orkney chair, c 1960s.  This chair was commissioned and hand made in Kirkwall, Orkney Islands.  Oak frame with carved detail to the arms, hooded straw back rest (oat grass sewn with bent grass), and a woven rush removable seat.  The hooded versions of these chairs were designed to offer warmth, and are much harder to come by. This one is In very good original condition.

A true design classic, the Orkney chair with it’s distinctive straw back was one of the icons of the Arts and Crafts movement.  Produced in the workshops of the Orkney Islands (Scotland), they were retailed by Liberty & Co and continue to be made today. This one dates to the 1960s. 

These chairs were traditionally made in either gentlemen, ladies or children's size. This one is the traditional lady's size. Dimensions:  H150cm, H43cm (to seat), W56cm, D50cm.

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A classic oak hooded straw back Orkney chair, c 1960s.  This chair was commissioned and hand made in Kirkwall, Orkney Islands.  Oak frame with carved detail to the arms, hooded straw back rest (oat grass sewn with bent grass), and a woven rush removable seat.  The hooded versions of these chairs were designed to offer warmth, and are much harder to come by. This one is In very good original condition.

A true design classic, the Orkney chair with it’s distinctive straw back was one of the icons of the Arts and Crafts movement.  Produced in the workshops of the Orkney Islands (Scotland), they were retailed by Liberty & Co and continue to be made today. This one dates to the 1960s. 

These chairs were traditionally made in either gentlemen, ladies or children's size. This one is the traditional lady's size. Dimensions:  H150cm, H43cm (to seat), W56cm, D50cm.

Orkney straw chairs have been made on the Orkney Islands of Scotland for generations. In May 1890 a local Kirkwall joiner, David Kirkness, was invited to exhibit two of his traditional straw chairs as part of the Scottish Home Industries Association display at the Scottish International Exhibition in Edinburgh. The chairs generated widespread interest, particularly amongst followers of the Arts and Crafts movement. And so the traditional straw chair became the fashionable Orkney chair. They were very popular, and by 1909 Liberty of London were selling over 40 chairs a month. They are made in three sizes: a gentleman, ladies and children chair, and were offered as hooded or non-hooded versions. The tradition of Orkney chair making continues today, and they are highly collectible. The older, and hooded versions are the most sought after.