Walcot and Co

Parian figure of Psyche

0.00
sold out
Parian ware style figurine
Parian ware style figurine
Parian ware style figurine
Parian ware style figurine
Parian ware style figurine
Parian ware style figurine
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00207 - 8.jpg
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Parian figure of Psyche

0.00
sold out

A Parian ware figurine of Psyche, Greek Goddess of the Soul.  Unmarked. The figure is in overall good condition, but there has been some historic damage to the base (professionally restored)  but with toe missing.  It is a beautiful decorative figure. 

In Greek mythology, Psyche was the sister of pandora, and very beautiful. She was the wife of Eros, the God of Love. 

Dimensions: H33cm W12cm D10cm

Parian Ware was very popular with the Victorians.  By the end of the 19th Century, every Victorian parlour would have had at least one piece of it, typically small-scale copies of busts of literary and political figures, as well as its decorative vases, boxes and figures. 

Potters made Parian statues by slip-casting. They poured liquid porcelain, or slip, into a mold and allowed it to harden enough to coat the walls of the mold. They then poured out the excess, creating a thin-walled, hollow form.

Potteries all over Britain produced Parian pieces. Leading makers included Copeland, Minton, Worcester, Wedgwood, Goss, and Robinson and Leadbeater. Much of the statuary was copies of the work of the period’s finest artists, who approved of the reproduction of their art in Parian.Generally, only the major Parian makers marked their pieces and then it is only usually statuary.   Many non-statuary pieces weren’t marked at all.

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A Parian ware figurine of Psyche, Greek Goddess of the Soul.  Unmarked. The figure is in overall good condition, but there has been some historic damage to the base (professionally restored)  but with toe missing.  It is a beautiful decorative figure. 

In Greek mythology, Psyche was the sister of pandora, and very beautiful. She was the wife of Eros, the God of Love. 

Dimensions: H33cm W12cm D10cm

Parian Ware was very popular with the Victorians.  By the end of the 19th Century, every Victorian parlour would have had at least one piece of it, typically small-scale copies of busts of literary and political figures, as well as its decorative vases, boxes and figures. 

Potters made Parian statues by slip-casting. They poured liquid porcelain, or slip, into a mold and allowed it to harden enough to coat the walls of the mold. They then poured out the excess, creating a thin-walled, hollow form.

Potteries all over Britain produced Parian pieces. Leading makers included Copeland, Minton, Worcester, Wedgwood, Goss, and Robinson and Leadbeater. Much of the statuary was copies of the work of the period’s finest artists, who approved of the reproduction of their art in Parian.Generally, only the major Parian makers marked their pieces and then it is only usually statuary.   Many non-statuary pieces weren’t marked at all.